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The protective effects of Schisandra chinensis fruit extract and its lignans against cardiovascular disease: a review of the molecular mechanisms.

Schisandra chinensis

The protective effects of Schisandra chinensis fruit extract and its lignans against cardiovascular disease: a review of the molecular mechanisms. Fitoterapia. 2014 Sep;97:224-33 Authors: Chun JN, Cho M, So I, Jeon JH Abstract Schisandra chinensis fruit extract (SCE) has traditionally been used as an oriental medicine for the treatment of various human diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Advances in scientific knowledge and analytical technologies provide opportunities for translational research involving S. chinensis; such research may contribute to future drug discovery. To date, emerging experimental evidence supports the therapeutic effects of the SCE or its bioactive lignan ingredients in cardiovascular disease, unraveling the mechanistic basis for their pharmacological actions. In the present review, we highlight SCE and its lignans as promising resources for the development of safe, effective, and multi-targeted agents against cardiovascular disease. Moreover, we offer novel insight into future challenges […] – Read More



Herbal Medicine Treatment for Drug-Induced Parkinsonism.

Parkinson’s Disease

Herbal Medicine Treatment for Drug-Induced Parkinsonism. J Altern Complement Med. 2015 Apr 20; Authors: Shim YH, Park JY, Choi WW, Min IK, Park SU, Jung WS, Moon SK, Park JM, Ko CN, Cho KH, Cho SY Abstract OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of herbal medicine in drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) and identify an optimal treatment approach. DESIGN: Retrospective review of DIP cases treated with herbal medicine. SETTINGS/LOCATION: The Parkinson’s clinic at Kyung Hee Traditional Korean Medicine Hospital, Korea. PATIENTS: Twenty-one patients whose clinical outcome and offending drug could be identified. OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical features, treatments, and outcomes and summarized the clinical course and treatment in each case. RESULTS: Twelve patients had levosulpiride-induced parkinsonism and 9 had parkinsonism induced by another drug. The offending drugs were discontinued in all patients, and all patients received herbal medications during treatment. Nine of 12 patients […] – Read More



Effects of a traditional herbal medicine on peripheral blood flow in women experiencing peripheral coldness: a randomized controlled trial.

Narcissus

Effects of a traditional herbal medicine on peripheral blood flow in women experiencing peripheral coldness: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2015 Apr 2;15(1):105 Authors: Nishida S, Eguchi E, Ohira T, Kitamura A, Kato YH, Hagihara K, Iso H Abstract BACKGROUND: In Japan, a traditional herbal medicine, Tokishigyakukagoshuyushokyoto (TJ-38), is often used for the treatment of peripheral coldness, which is a common complaint among Japanese women. However, the effects of this herbal medicine have yet to be examined in a randomized controlled trial. In the current study, the effect of TJ-38 on the peripheral blood flow in women experiencing peripheral coldness was investigated using a parallel-group randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Fifty-eight women aged 23 to 79 years with peripheral coldness were randomly divided into the intervention or control group. They were examined using cold bathing tests, physical examinations, and […] – Read More



Recreational drugs: a new health hazard for patients with concomitant chronic liver diseases.

Recreational drugs

Recreational drugs: a new health hazard for patients with concomitant chronic liver diseases. J Gastrointestin Liver Dis. 2014 Mar;23(1):79-84 Authors: Tarantino G, Citro V, Finelli C Abstract Our purpose in this article is to review the effects of recreational drugs, used either on their own but principally combined with alcohol consumption, in determining hepatic injury or influencing the evolution of some chronic diseases of the liver, specifically HCV infection and NAFLD. A deleterious role of daily use of recreational drugs, in particularly cannabis, has been shown to demonstrate clearly a rapid progression of fibrosis and steatosis, leading to a major severity in patients with chronic hepatitis C. On the other hand, the effects of the misuse of these substances on NAFLD, the main obesity-related comorbidity, leading to addiction, is still to be elucidated even though some clues to the recreational […] – Read More



A review of the medicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of the genus Sapium.

Sapium glandulosum

A review of the medicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of the genus Sapium. J Ethnopharmacol. 2014 Aug 8;155(1):9-20 Authors: Al Muqarrabun LM, Ahmat N, Aris SR Abstract ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Several species from the genus Sapium possess a broad range of medicinal properties and they have been used as traditional medicines by indigenous groups in several regions such as Malaysia, Africa, Southern China and Bolivia. Most of the species reported to possess therapeutic effects which are used for the treatment of skin-related diseases such as eczema and dermatitis, but they may also be used for overstrain, lumbago, constipation and hernia. Species of this genus are also used to treat wounds and snake bites. In addition, the saps/latex of Sapium glandulosum, Sapium indicum and Sapium sebiferum have/has toxic effects and are used as bird and fish poisons. This review discusses the current […] – Read More



Complementary and Integrative Therapies for Lower Urinary Tract Diseases.

Lower Urinary Tract Diseases

Complementary and Integrative Therapies for Lower Urinary Tract Diseases. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract. 2015 Mar 30; Authors: Raditic DM Abstract Consumer use of integrative health care is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. Research of veterinary lower urinary tract diseases could be translated to human medicine because veterinary patients are valuable translational models for human urinary tract infection and urolithiasis. An overview of complementary therapies for lower urinary tract disease includes cranberry supplements, mannose, oral probiotics, acupuncture, methionine, herbs, or herbal preparations. Therapies evaluated in dogs and cats, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species, in vivo and in vitro, are presented for their potential use as integrative therapies for veterinary patients and/or translational research. PMID: 25838155 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]



A prospective randomized study of the effectiveness of aromatherapy for relief of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Essential Oils

A prospective randomized study of the effectiveness of aromatherapy for relief of postoperative nausea and vomiting. J Perianesth Nurs. 2014 Feb;29(1):5-11 Authors: Hodge NS, McCarthy MS, Pierce RM Abstract INTRODUCTION: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a major concern for patients having surgery under general anesthesia as it causes subjective distress along with increased complications and delays in discharge from the hospital. Aromatherapy represents a complementary and alternative therapy for the management of PONV. PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of aromatherapy (QueaseEase, Soothing Scents, Inc, Enterprise, AL) versus an unscented inhalant in relieving PONV. METHODS: One hundred twenty-one patients with postoperative nausea were randomized into a treatment group receiving an aromatic inhaler and a control group receiving a placebo inhaler to evaluate the effectiveness of aromatherapy. FINDINGS: Initial and follow-up nausea assessment scores in […] – Read More



Stepping from traditional to integrative medicine: perspectives of Israeli-Arab patients on complementary medicine’s role in cancer care.

Cancer Care

Stepping from traditional to integrative medicine: perspectives of Israeli-Arab patients on complementary medicine’s role in cancer care. Ann Oncol. 2014 Feb;25(2):476-80 Authors: Ben-Arye E, Massalha E, Bar-Sela G, Silbermann M, Agbarya A, Saad B, Lev E, Schiff E Abstract BACKGROUND: Limited research is available on the perspectives of patients with cancer regarding integration of complementary medicine (CM) in conventional supportive cancer care. The purpose of this study was to explore patients’ perspectives concerning CM integration within conventional oncology settings. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A 27-item questionnaire was constructed and administered to a convenient sample of Arab patients receiving cancer care in three oncology centers in northern Israel. RESULTS: Of the 324 respondents (94.7% response rate), 124 of 313 (39.6%) reported the use of CM for cancer-related outcomes. A logistic regression model indicated that CM was used with active chemo- or radiotherapy […] – Read More



Effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality in cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

Rosa damascena

Effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality in cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2014 Aug;20(3):159-63 Authors: Hajibagheri A, Babaii A, Adib-Hajbaghery M Abstract OBJECTIVE: Sleep disorders are common among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit (CCU). This study aimed to investigate the effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality of patients hospitalized in CCU. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were conveniently sampled and randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. In the experimental group, patients received routine care and Rosa damascene aromatherapy for three subsequent nights. In the both groups the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. RESULTS: After the study, the mean scores of five domains of Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index […] – Read More



Thymoquinone and its therapeutic potentials.

Nigella sativa

Thymoquinone and its therapeutic potentials. Pharmacol Res. 2015 Mar 27; Authors: Darakhshan S, Pour AB, Colagar AH, Sisakhtnezhad S Abstract Herbal medicine has attracted great attention in the recent years and is increasingly used as alternatives to chemical drugs. Several lines of evidence support the positive impact of medicinal plants in the prevention and cure of a wide range of diseases. Thymoquinone (TQ) is the most abundant constituent of the volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds and most properties of Nigella sativa are mainly attributed to TQ. A number of pharmacological actions of TQ have been investigated including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-histaminic, anti-microbial and anti-tumor effects. It has also gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and neuroprotective activities. In addition, positive effects of TQ in cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, reproductive disorders and respiratory ailments, as well as in the treatment of bone complications as […] – Read More



Systematic review of traditional chinese medicine for depression in Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s Disease

Systematic review of traditional chinese medicine for depression in Parkinson’s disease. Am J Chin Med. 2014;42(5):1035-51 Authors: Zhang Y, Wang ZZ, Sun HM, Li P, Li YF, Chen NH Abstract Depression is the most common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Recent clinical trials have evaluated the effectiveness of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the treatment of depression in PD (dPD). However, the results are conflicting rather than conclusive. To investigate the effectiveness of TCM for the treatment of dPD, a systematic review was conducted. Literature searches and collections were performed to identify studies addressing the treatment of TCM for dPD. The methodological quality and risk of bias in all studies included were evaluated. Weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used as the effect measure. Finally, a total of 10 studies involving 582 patients were identified. […] – Read More



Lawsonia inermis L. (henna): ethnobotanical, phytochemical and pharmacological aspects.

Lawsonia inermis (Henna)

Lawsonia inermis L. (henna): ethnobotanical, phytochemical and pharmacological aspects. J Ethnopharmacol. 2014 Aug 8;155(1):80-103 Authors: Badoni Semwal R, Semwal DK, Combrinck S, Cartwright-Jones C, Viljoen A Abstract ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The use of Lawsonia inermis L. (henna) for medicinal and cosmetic purposes is inextricably linked to ancient and modern cultures of North Africa and Asia. Literature and artwork indicates that Lawsonia inermis played an important holistic role in the daily lives of some ancient cultures, providing psychological and medicinal benefits, as well as being used for personal adornment. Although henna was historically applied to the hands and feet to protect against fungal pathogens and to hair to combat lice and dandruff, other traditional uses include the treatment of liver and digestive disorders, reduction of tissue loss in leprosy, diabetic foot disorders and ulcers. PHYTOCHEMISTRY: Almost 70 phenolic compounds have been isolated […] – Read More



Suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses by pharmacologically potent fungus Ganoderma lucidum.

Ganoderma lucidum

Suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses by pharmacologically potent fungus Ganoderma lucidum. Recent Pat Inflamm Allergy Drug Discov. 2014;8(2):104-17 Authors: Bhardwaj N, Katyal P, Sharma AK Abstract Acute inflammation is the result of a complex signal transduction pathway that protects and heals our body and is necessary for our good health and normal wellbeing. Whereas, chronic inflammation can be correlated well with the onset of a plethora of autoimmune disorders; rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and polymyalgia, rheumatic and other diseases like asthma, inflammatory bowel diseases, cardiovascular disorders, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Also, it has been reported to be associated with the onset of various cancers. An effective anti-inflammatory drug should be able to inhibit the development of chronic inflammation without interfering in normal homeostasis. A number of herbal drugs have been identified in the past that can target inflammatory […] – Read More



Developing therapies for peanut allergy.

Peanut

Developing therapies for peanut allergy. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2014;165(3):179-94 Authors: Bublin M, Breiteneder H Abstract: Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated, persisting immune disorder that is of major concern worldwide. Currently, no routine immunotherapy is available to treat this often severe and sometimes fatal food allergy. Traditional subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy with crude peanut extracts has proven not feasible due to the high risk of severe systemic side effects. The allergen-specific approaches under preclinical and clinical investigation comprise subcutaneous, oral, sublingual and epicutaneous immunotherapy with whole-peanut extracts as well as applications of hypoallergenic peanut allergens or T cell epitope peptides. Allergen-nonspecific approaches include monoclonal anti-IgE antibodies, TCM herbal formulations and Toll-like receptor 9-based immunotherapy. The potential of genetically engineered plants with reduced allergen levels is being explored as well as the beneficial influence of lactic acid bacteria and soybean isoflavones on peanut […] – Read More



The effectiveness of essential oils for patients with neck pain: a randomized controlled study.

Essential Oils

The effectiveness of essential oils for patients with neck pain: a randomized controlled study. J Altern Complement Med. 2014 Oct;20(10):771-9 Authors: Ou MC, Lee YF, Li CC, Wu SK Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of aromatic essential oils on neck pain. DESIGN: Sixty participants with a history of neck pain and Neck Disability Index (NDI) score >10% were selected and randomly divided into control and experimental groups. SETTING: Motion analysis laboratory at Hungkuang University. INTERVENTION: For the experimental group, the intervention included 3% concentration cream composed of four essential oils: marjoram, black pepper, lavender, and peppermint. For the control group, only an unscented cream was provided. For 4 weeks, all patients applied 2 g cream directly to the affected area daily after showering or bathing. OUTCOME MEASURES: Assessment was performed by using a visual analogue scale (VAS), NDI, pressure pain […] – Read More



Alternative approach for mitigation of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity using herbal agents.

Cardiotoxicity

Alternative approach for mitigation of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity using herbal agents. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2014;9(3):288-97 Authors: Khan MA, Singh M, Khan MS, Ahmad W, Najmi AK, Ahmad S Abstract Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective and frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various malignancies. However, its clinical use is hampered due to the development of cardiotoxicity. Investigations have proved that DOX-induced cardiotoxicity occurs through mechanisms other than those mediating its antitumor effect. This theory sheds light on the development of strategies for cardioprotection without altering therapeutic effectiveness of DOX. Bioactive plant constituents of dietary supplements, traditional herbs and foods with potential health benefits can play an important role in therapeutics. This manuscript is an exhaustive review and prospect of herbal and botanical agents against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity with their proposed mechanisms. The activity of herbs evaluated against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity has shown number of mechanisms […] – Read More



The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Syst Rev. 2015;4(1):19 Authors: Catalá-López F, Hutton B, Núñez-Beltrán A, Mayhew AD, Page MJ, Ridao M, Tobías A, Catalá MA, Tabarés-Seisdedos R, Moher D Abstract BACKGROUND: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of children and adolescents, with a significant impact on health services and the community in terms of economic and social burdens. The objective of this systematic review will be to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in children and adolescents with ADHD. METHODS: Searches involving PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews will be used to identify related systematic reviews and relevant randomized trials. Search results will be supplemented […] – Read More



Plants used in traditional medicine: extracts and secondary metabolites exhibiting antileishmanial activity.

Leishmania

Plants used in traditional medicine: extracts and secondary metabolites exhibiting antileishmanial activity. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2014;9(3):187-204 Authors: Passero LF, Laurenti MD, Santos-Gomes G, Soares Campos BL, Sartorelli P, Lago JH Abstract Plants and their extracts have been used traditionally against different pathologies, and in some poor regions they are the only therapeutic source for treatments. Moreover, the identification of specific active secondary metabolites can be account for amelioration of clinical status of suffering individual. A series of ethnopharmacological surveys conducted in Brazil recorded the traditional use of plants against different pathologies and interestingly, some of them presented antileishmanial activity in vitro and in vivo, possibly due to their immunostimulatory, healing and microbicidal properties. Of note, Leishmania parasites can alter patient’s immunological status, leading to the development of extensive skin and/or visceral alterations. Therefore, the extracts or secondary metabolites presented in […] – Read More



Antimalarial activity of medicinal plants from the democratic republic of Congo: A review.

Malaria

Antimalarial activity of medicinal plants from the democratic republic of Congo: A review. J Ethnopharmacol. 2015 Apr 8; Authors: Memvanga PB, Tona GL, Mesia GK, Lusakibanza MM, Cimanga RK Abstract ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Malaria is the most prevalent parasitic disease and the foremost cause of morbidity and mortality in the Democratic Republic of Congo. For the management of this disease, a large Congolese population recourses to traditional medicinal plants. To date the efficacy and safety of many of these plants have been validated scientifically in rodent malaria models. In order to generate scientific evidence of traditional remedies used in the Democratic Republic of Congo for the management of malaria, and show the potential of Congolese plants as a major source of antimalarial drugs, this review highlights the antiplasmodial and toxicological properties of the Congolese antimalarial plants investigated during the period of […] – Read More



Cannabis abstinence during treatment and one-year follow-up: relationship to neural activity in men.

Cannabis spp (Marijuana)

Cannabis abstinence during treatment and one-year follow-up: relationship to neural activity in men. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2014 Sep;39(10):2288-98 Authors: Kober H, DeVito EE, DeLeone CM, Carroll KM, Potenza MN Abstract Cannabis is among the most frequently abused substances in the United States. Cognitive control is a contributory factor in the maintenance of substance-use disorders and may relate to treatment response. Therefore, we assessed whether cognitive-control-related neural activity before treatment differs between treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent and healthy individuals and relates to cannabis-abstinence measures during treatment and 1-year follow-up. Cannabis-dependent males (N=20) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) cognitive-control (Stroop) task before a 12-week randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy and/or contingency management. A healthy-comparison group (N=20) also completed the fMRI task. Cannabis use was assessed by urine toxicology and self-report during treatment, and by self-report across a 1-year follow-up period (N=18). The cannabis-dependent […] – Read More



Medicinal plants in the treatment of women’s disorders: Analytical strategies to assure quality, safety and efficacy.

Vitex agnus castus

Medicinal plants in the treatment of women’s disorders: Analytical strategies to assure quality, safety and efficacy. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2015 Mar 28; Authors: Masullo M, Montoro P, Mari A, Pizza C, Piacente S Abstract During last decades an increasing number of herbal products specifically targeting women’s disorders has appeared in the worldwide marketplace. This growth highlights the need for a critical evaluation of quality, safety and efficacy of these products. Analytical techniques applied to the quality control of the main medicinal plants used for women health (relief of menopause and menstrual related symptoms) have been reviewed. Thanks to the innovation in analytical technology, identification and detection of secondary metabolites dramatically improved. In particular, hyphenated techniques have proved to be the most suitable for the rapid identification of compounds in plant matrix. Moreover, taking into account that differences in sample […] – Read More



Ginger from ancient times to the new outlook.

Zingiber officinale (Ginger)

Ginger from ancient times to the new outlook. Jundishapur J Nat Pharm Prod. 2015 Feb;10(1):e18402 Authors: Khodaie L, Sadeghpoor O Abstract CONTEXT: Ginger is the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, a perennial plant, used alone or in compounds as a spice or remedy in ancient recipes of Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) as an effective tonic for the memory and digestive system, the opener of hepatic obstructions, aphrodisiac, for expelling compact wind from stomach and intestines, diluting, desiccating and emollient of phlegmatic and compact humor sticking to body organs, stomach, intestine, brain and throat. The ITM scholars believed that ginger was a vermifuge as well as a remedy for paralysis and obstructive jaundice. They also revealed that this phytomedicine cures diarrhea due to corrupted food. This study aimed to compare the medicinal properties (afaal) of ginger in ITM with those indicated in […] – Read More



Obesity and Clinical Riskiness Relationship: Therapeutic Management by Dietary Antioxidant Supplementation-a Review.

Obesity

Obesity and Clinical Riskiness Relationship: Therapeutic Management by Dietary Antioxidant Supplementation-a Review. Appl Biochem Biotechnol. 2015 Apr 12; Authors: Hassan HA, El-Gharib NE Abstract Obesity is a global health problem affecting all age groups, leading to many complications such as type 2 diabetes, systemic hypertension, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and stroke. Physiologically, obesity arises from metabolic changes in the tissues and organs of the human body; these changes result in an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, which in turn results in increased fat accumulation in adipose tissue. Such fat accumulation predisposes individuals to development of several health problems. Two different obesity treatment drugs are currently on the market; Orlistat, which reduces intestinal fat absorption via inhibiting pancreatic lipase, and Sibutramine, an anorectic or appetite suppressant. Both drugs have hazardous side effects, including increased blood pressure, dry mouth, constipation, […] – Read More



Natural products for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and comorbid conditions.

Diabetes mellitus

Natural products for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and comorbid conditions. J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2014 Sep-Oct;54(5):e304-18; quiz e319-21 Authors: Smith JD, Clinard VB Abstract OBJECTIVE: To provide pharmacists with practical information to guide consumers in their choices of herbal products and dietary supplements for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its comorbid disease states. SUMMARY: The herbal and dietary supplement market has grown exponentially over the past decade as Americans increasingly use such agents for generalized health and the prevention and treatment of chronic disease states.1 Pharmacist advice is often requested on the use of these agents for the management of T2DM; however, this is an area that has insufficient evidence to support confident recommendations. Many published studies involving herbal agents and dietary supplements are small and poorly designed, with heterogeneous results. Pharmacists […] – Read More



Hypericum perforatum L. preparations for menopause: a meta-analysis of efficacy and safety.

Hypericum perforatum (St Johns Wort)

Hypericum perforatum L. preparations for menopause: a meta-analysis of efficacy and safety. Climacteric. 2014 Aug;17(4):325-35 Authors: Liu YR, Jiang YL, Huang RQ, Yang JY, Xiao BK, Dong JX Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare by meta-analysis the efficacy and adverse events of Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John’s Wort), or its combinations, and placebo for menopausal women. DESIGN: A systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out by searching in Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Embase and the Web of Science database. RESULTS: Extracts of Hypericum perforatum L. and its combination with herbs were significantly superior to placebo (standard mean difference = -1.08; 95% confidence interval -1.38 to -0.77); extracts of Hypericum perforatum L. proved to be more effective than placebo in the treatment of menopause. Adverse events occurred in 53 (17.4%) patients on Hypericum perforatum L. preparations and 45 (15.4%) patients on placebo (relative risk […] – Read More



Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars.

Hypertrophic Scars

Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015;2015:101340 Authors: Ye Q, Wang SJ, Chen JY, Rahman K, Xin HL, Zhang H Abstract Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing […] – Read More



Clinical Effects of Thai Herbal Compress: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Herbal medicines

Clinical Effects of Thai Herbal Compress: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015;2015:942378 Authors: Dhippayom T, Kongkaew C, Chaiyakunapruk N, Dilokthornsakul P, Sruamsiri R, Saokaew S, Chuthaputti A Abstract Objective. To determine the clinical effects of Thai herbal compress. Methods. International and Thai databases were searched from inception through September 2014. Comparative clinical studies investigating herbal compress for any indications were included. Outcomes of interest included level of pain, difficulties in performing activities, and time from delivery to milk secretion. Mean changes of the outcomes from baseline were compared between herbal compress and comparators by calculating mean difference. Results. A total of 13 studies which involved 778 patients were selected from 369 articles identified. The overall effects of Thai herbal compress on reducing osteoarthritis (OA) and muscle pain were not different from those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory […] – Read More



Gymnema sylvestre R. Br., an Indian Medicinal Herb: Traditional Uses, Chemical Composition, and Biological Activity.

Gymnema sylvestre

Gymnema sylvestre R. Br., an Indian Medicinal Herb: Traditional Uses, Chemical Composition, and Biological Activity. Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2015;16(6):506-516 Authors: Di Fabio G, Romanucci V, Di Marino C, Pisanti A, Zarrelli A Abstract Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. is one of the most important medicinal plants that grows in tropical forests in India and South East Asia. Its active ingredients and extracts of leaves and roots are used in traditional medicine to treat various ailments and they are present in the market for pharmaceutical and parapharmaceutical products. Commercial products based on substances of plant origin that are generally connoted as natural have to be subjected to monitoring and evaluation by health authorities for their potential impacts on public health. The monitoring and evaluation of these products are critical because the boundary between a therapeutic action and a functional or healthy activity […] – Read More



Taraxacum officinale and related species – an ethnopharmacological review and its potential as a commercial medicinal plant.

Taraxacum officinale (Dandelion)

Taraxacum officinale and related species – an ethnopharmacological review and its potential as a commercial medicinal plant. J Ethnopharmacol. 2015 Apr 6; Authors: Martinez M, Poirrier P, Chamy R, Prüfer D, Schulze-Gronover C, Jorquera L, Ruiz G Abstract ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Dandelion (Taraxacum spec) is a wild plant that has been used for centuries as a traditional medicine in the relief and treatment of several diseases. This use is due to the presence of sesquiterpenes, saponins, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and sugars, among others, found in the organs of the plant. AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of this work is to provide a current review of developments and trends in research on the Taraxacum genus, with a focus on traditional uses and pharmacological properties. This should shed light on the potential of this plant as an attractive commercial herbal medicine. MATERIALS […] – Read More



A systematic review of the evidence for topical use of ginger.

Zingiber officinale (Ginger)

A systematic review of the evidence for topical use of ginger. Explore (NY). 2013 Nov-Dec;9(6):361-4 Authors: Ding M, Leach MJ, Bradley H Abstract BACKGROUND: The use of ginger as a topical intervention is widely advocated in the popular media. However, there has been no attempt to date to synthesize the evidence for topically administered ginger. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review and synthesize the best available evidence of effectiveness for topical ginger in any condition. DATA SOURCES: CAM on PubMed, CINAHL, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, National Library of Australia, The Cochrane Library, TRIP, pertinent texts, and bibliographies of relevant papers. STUDY SELECTION: Data sources were systematically searched for studies investigating the clinical effectiveness of topical ginger, in any form and for any condition, regardless of study design. Studies were limited to those published between 1980 and 2010, and published in English, Mandarin, Cantonese, […] – Read More